American College of Physicians: Internal Medicine — Doctors for Adults ®

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Crossed Words: Glued to the answer

From the January ACP Internist, copyright 2014 by the American College of Physicians

By Justin Vader, MD, ACP Resident/Fellow Member

Answers to clues are placed horizontally in rows to reveal an answer written vertically. Unlike the familiar acrostic puzzle format, the final answer can be in any column.

Horizontal clues

1) Deadly delectable liquidates liver

2) Research training continues and continues and continues

3) Prominent and articulate—for a bone

4) S [with a line over top the letter]

5) Bone scan negative

6) Pick another—cause of deranged lipids, lungs and liver

7) Congenital curve or circumcision complication

Find in the vertical columns: A common hydrocarbon solvent of abuse. The puzzle grid is here.

Bonus clue, find in the vertical columns: Seizing a solution, VOC for AED?

Answer: Toluene

The answer grid is here. Toluene is a light colorless liquid solvent found in many commonly abused inhalants, including model airplane glue, paint sprays, and paint and nail polish removers. Widely used, easy available and inexpensive, it’s a popular inhalant among teenagers. Entry into the brain is extremely fast with nearly immediate effects that can last several hours. These include euphoria, grandiosity, floating sensation, drowsiness, delusions and hallucinations. Side effects include irritation, headache, nystagmus, slurred speech, ataxia, staggering, nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression, convulsions, severe organ damage, coma, and death. (Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Accessed online.)

Bonus answer: Acetone
Photo by iStock

Photo by iStock



Acetone is a volatile organic compound (VOC), but it has possible properties as an antiepileptic drug (AED). Acetone, one of three ketones elevated by a ketogenic diet, is directly responsible for the diet’s anticonvulsant effects. Chronic administration may enhance its action, but further research is needed to confirm that the ketogenic diet generates relevant concentrations of acetone. Source: Likhodii SS, Burnham WM. Ketogenic diet: does acetone stop seizures? Med Sci Monit. 2002;8:HY19-24. [PMID:12165751]

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